Lesser-Known Wonders of the World

While many historical landmarks attract millions of travellers every year, these ancient sites lie off the typical tourist trail.  When it comes to ancient wonders, there’s more to explore than Petra, Angkor Wat and the Coliseum. So to uncover a few structures or lesser-known wonders that aren’t typically on the tourist trail, we turned to question-and-answer site Quora, where users have been sharing their opinions on some of the most impressive ancient structures in the world. What made the list? Among others: a network of ancient Micronesian floating islands, an underground Anatolian city carved entirely of volcanic rock and a prehistoric Phoenician site comprised of monumental stone blocks so large, it remains a mystery how they were cut and moved.

Derinkuyu, Turkey

bbc.com

Underneath the small town of Derinkuyu, 750km southeast of Istanbul in Cappadocia’s Nevsehir province, lies the largest system of caverns ever built by hand – Derinkuyu – Turkey’s underground city, which shares a name with its more conventional, above-ground counterpart.

This ancient Anatolian wonder has all the trappings of a well-developed municipal centre, with schools, stables and churches – but rather than rising from the ground, Derinkuyu’s meeting places are carved from soft volcanic rock 60m to 85m beneath the surface.

Built between the 7th and 8th Century BC, the underground complex was built to defend against attacks from marauding armies. Though it was intended as a temporary shelter, its amenities were impressive: some 600 above-ground doors from which someone can enter the underground city from, 15,000 ventilation ducts to provide fresh air, as well as multiple wineries, cellars and a complex network of passages, tunnels, and corridors.    Read more…